Sunrise at Saxon Switzerland

A few photos from a weekend trip.

Berlin Cityscapes: Behind the Camera

I often shoot with my Canon 6D and my iPhone at the same time: sometimes the same compositions, sometimes different, sometimes just a back of my Canon. I often use these pictures, processed in VSCO Cam or Darkroom, as a color inspiration when I process Canon photos. Or, for example, I shoot at long exposure and after looking at iPhone photo I realise that short exposure works better.

Berlin Cityscapes

Finally after a year and a half of photography hibernation I’m shooting regularly again. I’ve made most of these photos in the last two months.

My First Photos

I bought my first camera in 2004, a film Canon EOS 300V with a kit lens. Then I added a Sigma 70-300, a cheap telephoto lens, that was occasionally able to make a sharp photo.

At that time I was shooting everything without thinking much. But I’ve made a few photos that I’m not ashamed of to this day.

Another Morning in Amsterdam Three Years Ago

In 2013 I went to Amsterdam for a job interview (I failed it) and had another Sunday morning for walk and shoot.

It’s interesting to compare these photos with newer photos in the previous post.

One April Morning in Amsterdam

In April I went to Amsterdam to a conference and had a free Sunday morning with very nice (for Amsterdam at least) weather to walk and shoot.

(If you’re interested in React.js, check out my conference notes.)

Tsiri the Saluki in Tallinn

I’ve finished a bunch of photos from out last Tallinn trip in 2014. It’s a Tsiri’s favourite dog beach. On some photos you could also see my wife Olga and Tsiri’s friend Fabi the saluki.

30 Tips to Improve your Landscape Photography Ebook

Some sound tips for beginners in this short free ebook by Capture Landscapes, including the crucial tips like slow down or, my favorite, buy a tripod.

I agree with most of the tips, strongly disagree with one, and have comments about a few:

8. Plan your shots

I’m terrible at planning and previsualization, and I don’t believe in them very much: knowing sunset time is good but getting stuck with imagined composition and miss better, but unplanned, shot is something I’d like to avoid.

I just arrive at a place and see what the nature has for me today.

13. Don’t get stuck with one lens

I like to shoot landscapes with both wide angle and telephoto lenses but having plenty of lenses exhorts you to choose lenses instead of shooting. And lenses are also heavy.

They suggest to have at least two lenses. I’d say that two is the best number.

21. Understand the “rule of thirds”

No, just no. There are no rules in photography.

28. Shoot quality rather than quantity

Your first 10,000 photographs are your worst.

When citing Henri Cartier-Bresson keep in mind that for him 10,000 shots was something like a month of shooting. Shoot as much as you need — just show only the best photographs.


You can get your copy by subscribing at Capture Landscapes site.

One Morning at Lake Bled

It was my first morning at Lake Bled and the most productive, in two hours I made four photos with completely different mood.

When I arrived at the lake I was astonished to see stars. I was planning to wait until sunrise but that had exceeded my expectations.

5:52.

When it’s OK to Remove People from Photos

I’ve seen the news that Steve McCurry removes people from his photos more than once in my feed already.

Image [from PetaPixel](http://petapixel.com/2016/05/06/botched-steve-mccurry-print-leads-photoshop-scandal/)

I think it’s more complicated than people on internet like to think.

It’s fine to remove people and other stuff from a landscape or a cityscape, people aren’t important for a photograph. If you remove people, remove them all.

But if people are crucial part of a photograph, if you’re making a composition of people and waiting for a perfect moment, then removing people means you haven’t waited for that memoment, you haven’t made that photograph. It should be just boring for any serious photographer.

And that stitching artifacts people found on McCurry’s photos — just a shameful work, no matter what you think about the morality of photo manipulation.